Hoarder In Another Man’s House

A cluttered life.

Hoarder In Another Man’s House

Are you a hoarder? It’s a simple question that often leads to complex answers. The word “hoarder” really came into its own a few years ago. At some point in the relatively recent past, we developed a fascination with those who chose to never throw anything away. For some strange reason we suddenly wanted to know all about the lives of those men and women who have an unexplainable obsession to hold onto everything. What is it about these people that have captivated us so? Is it because we want to know exactly how many empty pizza boxes they own? Or do we just like to feel sorry for people who are worse off than we are?

So, what exactly is a hoarder? This question is best answered by asking a second question; what is it that causes a person to become a hoarder? According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America (ADAA for short), hoarding is a disorder that is often a symptom of another disorder. People who suffer from obsessive-compulsive personality disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, depression, or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder can become hoarders. Hoarding is also a symptom of dementia. Even as a disorder by itself, the effects it can have on a person’s life can be tragic.

Hoarding can cause rifts in families, widened by both anger and resentment. More than just rifts, it can tear families apart. It can affect the afflicted physically, mentally, socially, and even financially.

In Hebrews 3:6, we read about a house not our own. “But Christ as a son over his own house; whose house we are, if we hold fast the confidence and the rejoicing of the hope firm unto the end.” As Christians, we are the house in which Jesus dwells. When we confess our sins and open our hearts to allow Him to come in, we are to step out of the way and let Him clean up our lives. That means we aren’t to sort through the things He tries to remove and hold onto them.

I was going to refer to us as “spiritual hoarders”, but realized that is not correct. When we hold on to the things God wants to remove, we become “unspiritual hoarders”. Too often we want to hold on to things like bad language, alcohol, lust, anger, grudges, hatred, discrimination, and so forth. (Let me just briefly say, as a matter of clarification, that calling something wrong which God has called a sin is NOT discrimination.) Once God removes everything unclean from our hearts and lives, it is up to us to make sure they stay that way. We do this through prayer, praise, worship, fellowship, and witnessing. When Christ abides in us, we are held accountable for everything we allow in our lives.

The best thing about letting God clean up our lives and remove the things we do not need is that He doesn’t leave us empty. He replaces what He removes with things from Him; blessings, love, joy, strength, hope, forgiveness, and more. Above all of these, however, is the gift of eternal life. The things we think we lose are worth infinitely less than the things we receive.

1281 Total Views 1 Views Today

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.